Giclée Canvas Printing

 

Giclée Canvas Prints on cotton artist canvas (340gms) are ideal for the reproduction of photographs or paintings and give added value to the artwork. Giclées printed on canvas have an extra special protection coating over the canvas print to make sure it does not get damaged from scratches or splashes and for greater UV stability


Fine Art Media vs.
There is a distinct difference between conventional photo grade paper and fine art paper. Fine art media is not only more substantial and richly textured, it's long-lasting. Fine art media is typically made from 100% cotton (except canvas which is usually 50% cotton & 50% polyester). It’s also acid-free and buffered against atmospheric acids. (Buffering neutralizes acids in the paper or environment using an alkaline substance such as usually calcium carbonate.) The media will last for centuries while providing a rich and elegant look. Virtually all fine art media are made by the same traditional methods that have been in use for hundreds of years. The materials used in these unique crafting methodologies are simple and pure and the process is environmentally friendly.
Why use Fine Art Media? The weight or thickness of fine art media is one key consideration. If you close you eyes and feel most typical inkjet media, you will realize that the differences between them are negligible. When you close you eyes and feel fine art media, the textures and the thickness in the stock are immediately apparent. The difference is like comparing a blade of grass to a rose petal. These unique substantive properties make fine art media the best choice for framing and display work.
Who is using Fine Art Media? Most users of desktop fine art media are professional photographers, graphics artists, and artists. However, more and more amateur photographers and desktop publishers are using fine art media to make their work unique and highly distinguishable from the work of their friends or competitors. Photographers and artists can publish promotional and presentation pieces or self-publish their work with desktop systems and fine art media. Several photographic and artists studios are also beginning to use an array of desktop printers in creating archival prints. They are finding that in some cases, the results can be equivalent to prints produced with more expensive methodologiesset.